Journal cover Journal topic
Ocean Science An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 2.289 IF 2.289
  • IF 5-year value: 2.756 IF 5-year
    2.756
  • CiteScore value: 2.76 CiteScore
    2.76
  • SNIP value: 1.050 SNIP 1.050
  • SJR value: 1.554 SJR 1.554
  • IPP value: 2.65 IPP 2.65
  • h5-index value: 30 h5-index 30
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 41 Scimago H
    index 41
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/osd-4-897-2007
© Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/osd-4-897-2007
© Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

  27 Nov 2007

27 Nov 2007

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript for further review has not been submitted.

On available energy in the ocean and its application to the Barents Sea

R. C. Levine1 and D. J. Webb2 R. C. Levine and D. J. Webb
  • 1Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, UK
  • 2National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Abstract. Following meteorological practice the definition of available potential energy in the ocean is conventionally defined in terms of the properties of the global ocean. However there is also a requirement for a localised definition, for example the energy released when shelf water cascades down a continental shelf in the Arctic and enters a boundary current.

In this note we start from first principals to obtain an exact expression for the available energy (AE) in such a situation. We show that the available energy depends on enstrophy and gravity. We also show that it is exactly equal to the work done by the pressure gradient and by buoyancy.

The results are used to investigate the distribution of AE in the Barents Sea and surrounding regions relative to the interior of the Arctic Ocean. We find that water entering the Barents Sea from the Atlantic already has a high AE, that it is increased by cooling but that much of the increase is lost overcoming turbulence during the passage through the region to the Arctic Ocean. However on entering the Arctic enough available energy remains to drive a significant current around the margin of the ocean. The core of raised available energy also acts as a tracer which can be followed along the continental slope beyond the dateline.

R. C. Levine and D. J. Webb
Interactive discussion
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Interactive discussion
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
R. C. Levine and D. J. Webb
R. C. Levine and D. J. Webb
Viewed  
Total article views: 877 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
539 283 55 877 47 52
  • HTML: 539
  • PDF: 283
  • XML: 55
  • Total: 877
  • BibTeX: 47
  • EndNote: 52
Views and downloads (calculated since 01 Feb 2013)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 01 Feb 2013)
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 20 Mar 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Citation