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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2019-57
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2019-57
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 11 Jun 2019

Submitted as: research article | 11 Jun 2019

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This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Ocean Science (OS).

Photoproduction of nitric oxide in seawater

Ye Tian1,2,3, Gui-Peng Yang1,2,3, Chun-Ying Liu1,2,3, Pei-Feng Li3, Hong-Tao Chen1,2,3, and Hermann W. Bange4 Ye Tian et al.
  • 1Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Qingdao, 266100, China
  • 2Laboratory for Marine Ecology and Environmental Science, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao 266071, China
  • 3College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, 266100, China
  • 4GEOMAR Helmholtz–Zentrum für Ozeanforschung Kiel, Kiel, 24105, Germany

Abstract. Nitric oxide (NO) is a short–lived intermediate of the oceanic nitrogen cycle. However, our knowledge about its production and consumption pathways in oceanic environments is rudimentary. In order to decipher the major factors affecting NO photochemical production, we irradiated artificial seawater samples as well as natural surface seawater samples in laboratory experiments. The seawater samples were collected during a cruise to the western tropical North Pacific Ocean (WTNP) from November 2015 to January 2016. NO photoproduction rates from dissolved nitrite in artificial seawater showed increasing trends with decreasing pH, increasing temperatures and increasing salinity. In contrast, NO photoproduction in from the natural seawater samples from the WTNP did not show any correlations with pH, water temperature and salinity as well as dissolved nitrite concentrations. NO photoproduction rates in the WTNP were significantly larger than the NO air–sea flux densities indicating a further NO loss process in the surface layer.

Ye Tian et al.
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Short summary
Nitric oxide (NO) could be produced by nitrite photolysis, the rates from dissolved nitrite in artificial seawater showed increasing trends with decreasing pH, increasing temperatures and increasing salinity. However, NO photoproduction from the natural seawater samples did not show correlations with pH, water temperature and salinity as well as dissolved nitrite concentrations in the western tropical North Pacific Ocean (WNTP). And there were other NO loss process in the surface layer of WNTP.
Nitric oxide (NO) could be produced by nitrite photolysis, the rates from dissolved nitrite in...
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