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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2019-50
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2019-50
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 11 Jun 2019

Research article | 11 Jun 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Ocean Science (OS).

Downscaling sea-level rise effects on tides and sediment dynamics in tidal bays

Long Jiang1, Theo Gerkema1, Déborah Idier2, Aimée B. A. Slangen1, and Karline Soetaert1 Long Jiang et al.
  • 1NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Department of Estuarine and Delta Systems, and Utrecht University, P.O. Box 140, 4400 AC Yerseke, The Netherlands
  • 2BRGM, 3, avenue C. Guillemin, 45060 Orléans cedex 2, France

Abstract. Sea-level rise (SLR) not only increases the threat of coastal flooding, but also may change tidal regimes in estuaries and coastal bays. To investigate such nearshore tidal responses to SLR, a hydrodynamic model of the European Shelf is downscaled to a model of a Dutch coastal bay (the Eastern Scheldt) and forced by SLR scenarios ranging from 0 to 2 m. The results indicate that SLR induces larger increases in tidal amplitude and stronger nonlinear tidal distortion in the bay compared to the adjacent shelf sea. Under SLR, the basin shifts from a mixed flood- and ebb-dominant state to complete ebb-dominance, causing enhanced sediment export and accelerated loss of tidal flats. In this case study, we find that local impacts of SLR can be highly spatially-varying and nonlinear depending on basin geometry. Our model downscaling approach is widely applicable for establishing local SLR projections in estuaries and coastal bays.

Long Jiang et al.
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Short summary
A model downscaling approach is used for investigating the effects of sea-level rise (SLR) on local tides. Results indicate that SLR induces larger increases in tidal amplitude and stronger nonlinear tidal distortion in the bay compared to the adjacent shelf sea. SLR can also change shallow-water tidal asymmetry and influence the direction and magnitude of residual sediment transport. The model downscaling approach is widely applicable for local SLR projections in estuaries and coastal bays.
A model downscaling approach is used for investigating the effects of sea-level rise (SLR) on...
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