Journal cover Journal topic
Ocean Science An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 2.539 IF 2.539
  • IF 5-year value: 3.129 IF 5-year
    3.129
  • CiteScore value: 2.78 CiteScore
    2.78
  • SNIP value: 1.217 SNIP 1.217
  • IPP value: 2.62 IPP 2.62
  • SJR value: 1.370 SJR 1.370
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 48 Scimago H
    index 48
  • h5-index value: 32 h5-index 32
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2019-48
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2019-48
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 17 Jul 2019

Submitted as: research article | 17 Jul 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Ocean Science (OS).

Ventilation of the Northern Baltic Sea

Thomas Neumann, Herbert Siegel, Matthias Moros, Monika Gerth, Madline Kniebusch, and Daniel Neumann Thomas Neumann et al.
  • Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, Rostock 18119 Warnemünde Seestr. 15, Germany

Abstract. The Baltic Sea is a semi-enclosed, brackish water sea in northern Europe. The deep basins of the central Baltic Sea regularly show hypoxic conditions. In contrast, the northern parts of the Baltic Sea, the Bothnian Sea and Bay, are well oxygenated. Lateral inflows or a ventilation due to convection are possible mechanisms for high oxygen concentrations in the deep water of the northern Baltic Sea.

Owing to the high latitudes of the northern Baltic, this region is regularly covered by sea ice during the winter season. In March 2017, the RV Maria S. Merian was for two days in the Bothnian Bay collecting ice core samples, brine water, and CTD profiles. The bulk sea ice salinity was on average 0.6 g/kg and in brine samples, a salinity of 11.5 g/kg and 17.8 g/kg have been measured. At one station, the CTD profiles indicated a recent ventilation event of the deep water. A water mass analysis showed that the ventilation is most probably due to mixing of Bothnian Sea and Bothnian Bay surface water which results in sufficient dense water able to replace older bottom water. However, the high salinity of brine provides the potential for forming dense bottom water masses as well.

Thomas Neumann et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Topic Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Thomas Neumann et al.
Thomas Neumann et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 271 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
207 61 3 271 5 5
  • HTML: 207
  • PDF: 61
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 271
  • BibTeX: 5
  • EndNote: 5
Views and downloads (calculated since 17 Jul 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 17 Jul 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 141 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 139 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 22 Oct 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
The northern Baltic Sea shows, in contrast to the central parts, well oxigenated bottom water. Details of the ventilation are not well investigated. In this study, we analyzed data obtained at a research vessel in March 2017 in the northern Baltic Sea. We followed two hypothesis (i) ventilation due to lateral inflows or (ii) vertical convection due to brine release from sea ice. Our data reveal that lateral inflows most likely ventilate the Bottom water in the northern Baltic Sea.
The northern Baltic Sea shows, in contrast to the central parts, well oxigenated bottom water....
Citation