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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2019-107
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2019-107
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 07 Oct 2019

Submitted as: research article | 07 Oct 2019

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Ocean Science (OS).

Impact of tidal dynamics on diel vertical migration of zooplankton in Hudson Bay

Vladislav Y. Petrusevich1, Igor A. Dmitrenko1, Andrea Niemi2, Sergey A. Kirillov1, Christina Michelle Kamula1, Zou Zou A. Kuzyk1, David G. Barber1, and Jens K. Ehn1 Vladislav Y. Petrusevich et al.
  • 1University of Manitoba, Centre for Earth Observation Science, Winnipeg, Canada
  • 2Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Abstract. Hudson Bay is a large, seasonally-ice covered Canadian inland sea, connected to the Arctic Ocean and North Atlantic through Foxe Basin and Hudson Strait. This study investigates zooplankton distribution, dynamics and factors controlling them during open water and ice cover periods (from September 2016 to October 2017) in Hudson Bay. A mooring equipped with two Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) and a sediment trap was deployed in September 2016 in Hudson Bay ~ 190 km north-east from the port of Churchill. The backscatter intensity and vertical velocity time series showed a pattern typical for the zooplankton diel vertical migration (DVM). Zooplankton collected by the sediment trap allowed for the identification of migrating scatters during the study period. From the acquired acoustic data we observed the interaction of DVM with multiple factors including lunar light, tides, as well as water and sea ice dynamics. Solar illuminance was the major factor determining migration pattern, but unlike at some other polar and sub-polar regions, moonlight had a little effect on DVM, while tidal dynamics is important. The presented data constitutes a first-ever observed presence of DVM in Hudson Bay during winter as well as its interaction with the tidal dynamics.

Vladislav Y. Petrusevich et al.
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Vladislav Y. Petrusevich et al.
Vladislav Y. Petrusevich et al.
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Short summary
The diel vertical migration of zooplankton considered the largest daily migration of biomass on earth. This study investigates zooplankton distribution, dynamics and factors controlling them during open water and ice cover periods in Hudson Bay, a large, seasonally-ice covered Canadian inland sea. The presented data constitutes a first-ever observed presence of diel vertical migration of zooplankton in Hudson Bay during winter as well as its interaction with the tidal dynamics.
The diel vertical migration of zooplankton considered the largest daily migration of biomass on...
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