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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2019-1
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2019-1
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 01 Mar 2019

Research article | 01 Mar 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Ocean Science (OS).

The influence of dissolved organic matter on the marine production of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disulfide (CS2) in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific

Sinikka T. Lennartz1,a, Marc von Hobe2, Dennis Booge1, Henry Bittig3, Tim Fischer1, Rafael Gonçalves-Araujo4,5, Kerstin B. Ksionzek4,6, Boris P. Koch4,7,8, Astrid Bracher4,8, Rüdiger Röttgers9, Birgit Quack1, and Christa A. Marandino1 Sinikka T. Lennartz et al.
  • 1GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Düsternbrooker Weg 20, 24105 Kiel, Germany
  • 2Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-7), Wilhelm-Johnen-Strasse, 52425 Jülich, Germany
  • 3Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, Seestraße 15, D-18119 Rostock
  • 4Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Am Handelshafen 12, 27570 Bremerhaven, Germany
  • 5Aarhus University, Department of Bioscience, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark
  • 6MARUM Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, Leobener Straße, D-28359 Bremen, Germany
  • 7University of Applied Sciences, An der Karlstadt, 27568 Bremerhaven
  • 8Institute of Environmental Physics, University of Bremen, 28334 Bremen, Germany
  • 9Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, 21502 Geesthacht, Germany
  • anow at: Insitute for Biology and Chemistry of the Marine Environment, University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg

Abstract. Oceanic emissions of the climate relevant trace gases carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disulfide (CS2) are a major source to their atmospheric budget. Their current and future emission estimates are still uncertain due to incomplete process understanding and, therefore, inexact quantification across different biogeochemical regimes. Here we present the first concurrent measurements of both gases together with related fractions of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool, i.e. solid-phase extractable dissolved organic sulfur (DOSSPE), chromophoric (CDOM) and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) from the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP). These observations are used to estimate in-situ production rates and identify their drivers. We find different limiting factors of marine photoproduction: while OCS production is limited by the humic-like DOM fraction that can act as a photosensitizer, high CS2 production coincides with high DOSSPE concentration. The lack of correlation between OCS production and DOSSPE may be explained by the active cycling of sulfur between OCS and dissolved inorganic sulfide via OCS photoproduction and hydrolysis. In addition, the only existing parameterization for OCS dark production is validated and updated with new rates from the ETSP and the Indian Ocean. Our results will help to predict oceanic concentrations and emissions of both gases on regional and, potentially, global scales.

Sinikka T. Lennartz et al.
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Short summary
The ocean emits the gases carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disulfide (CS2), which affect our climate. The goal of this study was to quantify at which rates both gases are produced in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP), one of the most productive oceanic regions worldwide. Both gases are produced by reactions triggered by sunlight, but we found that the amount produced depends on different factors. Our results improve numerical models to predict oceanic concentrations of both gases.
The ocean emits the gases carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disulfide (CS2), which affect our...
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