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Ocean Science An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/osd-9-2851-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/osd-9-2851-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 13 Sep 2012

Submitted as: research article | 13 Sep 2012

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Ocean Science (OS). The revised manuscript was not accepted.

Measurement of turbulence in the oceanic mixed layer using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

S. G. George and A. R. L. Tatnall S. G. George and A. R. L. Tatnall
  • Astronautics Research Group, Faculty of Engineering & the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

Abstract. Turbulence in the surface layer of the ocean contributes to the transfer of heat, gas and momentum across the air-sea boundary. As such, study of turbulence in the ocean surface layer is becoming increasingly important for understanding its effects on climate change. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) techniques were implemented to examine the interaction of small-scale wake turbulence in the upper ocean layer with incident electromagnetic radar waves. Hydrodynamic-electromagnetic wave interaction models were invoked to demonstrate the ability of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to observe and characterise surface turbulent wake flows. A range of simulated radar images are presented for a turbulent surface current field behind a moving surface vessel, and compared with the surface flow fields to investigate the impact of turbulent currents on simulated radar backscatter. This has yielded insights into the feasibility of resolving small-scale turbulence with remote-sensing radar and highlights the potential for extracting details of the flow structure and characteristics of turbulence using SAR.

S. G. George and A. R. L. Tatnall
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
S. G. George and A. R. L. Tatnall
S. G. George and A. R. L. Tatnall
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