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Ocean Science An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2017-29
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
29 May 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is under review for the journal Ocean Science (OS).
Non-hydrostatic effects in the Dead Sea
Oded Padon and Yosef Ashkenazy Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, BIDR, Ben-Gurion University, Midreshet Ben-Gurion, 84990, Israel
Abstract. The Dead Sea is the saltiest and lowest terminal lake in the world. Currently, the Dead Sea’s water level is dropping by more than 1 m per year, due to excessive use of the water that previously flowed into it. The Dead Sea constitutes a unique environment and is important from economic, environmental, and touristic points of view. The winter deep convection of the Dead Sea and its deep and narrow basin suggest that non-hydrostatic effects may significantly affect its circulation. Despite these factors, the expected non-hydrostatic effects on the circulation of the Dead Sea have not been investigated. Here we perform high resolution (100 m) ocean general circulation model (the MITgcm) simulations of the Dead Sea and show that the non-hydrostatic results are very different from the hydrostatic ones. Specifically, we show that the winter non-hydrostatic simulations resulted in a layer of dense water overlaying slightly lighter water during the several last hours of the night; this convection process involved plumes of heavier sinking water and the entrainment of the plumes. We also studied the effect of the wind stress’s diurnal variability and found it to be important, especially during the summer when the wind’s variability drastically increased the surface kinetic energy; however, it did not alter the depth density profile. The results presented here may be important for the Dead Sea’s potash industry and for the planned Red Sea-Dead Sea canal that aims to stop and, possibly, to increase the level of the Dead Sea using the Red Sea’s water.

Citation: Padon, O. and Ashkenazy, Y.: Non-hydrostatic effects in the Dead Sea, Ocean Sci. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2017-29, in review, 2017.
Oded Padon and Yosef Ashkenazy
Oded Padon and Yosef Ashkenazy
Oded Padon and Yosef Ashkenazy

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Short summary
The Dead Sea is the saltiest and lowest terminal lake in the world and it constitutes a unique environment-it is important from economic, environmental, and touristic points of view. Non-hydrostatic effects may significantly affect the Dead Sea circulation. Using a state-of-the-art ocean model we study the non-hydrostatic effects in the Dead Sea on the flow and show the such effects cannot be ignored. These effects are significant during the winter due to deep convection.
The Dead Sea is the saltiest and lowest terminal lake in the world and it constitutes a unique...
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